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Showing posts from August, 2015

Construction, Design and Management Regulations 2015 - Practical Implications for Conveyancers

Conveyancers should be alert to the Construction, Design and Management Regulations 2015 (became law on 6th April of 2015) when considering recent alterations to both freehold and leasehold property.
If your client owns, uses or manages a building and undertake maintenance or minor building work associated with the business premises, your client has a legal obligation to ensure that all work is carried out safely without damaging anyone’s health. The law covers the all aspects of the building project from start to finish such as how it is planned, organised, managed, project time-scales and phases, the contractor, the designer, welfare of the workers and others on site and health and safety record keeping.
It’s a piece of legislation that uses good design and planning to reduce the number of accidents on site. The latest update means that, for the first time, regulations will apply to construction work commissioned by home-owners. Of the 43 fatalities on construction sites last year, t…

Additional Enquiries - A Room 101 Opportunity

Do conveyancers  agree that the type of reply shown below should be sent in a concerted effort to bring an early end the growing practice adopted by many conveyancers out there who take great delight in raising copious and unnecessary additional enquiries?:
'Dear Sirs 
Thank you for your long list of additional enquiries. 
We do understand the principle of caveat emptor and the need for due diligence. However the Protocol as you know has made it very clear that solicitors should resist the urge of raising unnecessary enquires.  
Paragraph 32 of the Law Society Conveyancing Protocol states as you know that the buyer's solicitor should: 
'Resist raising any additional enquiries, including those about the state and condition of the building, that have answers which are capable of being ascertained by the buyer's own enquiries, survey or personal inspection. Such enquiries should not usually be raised. Indiscriminate use of 'standard' additional enquiries may const…